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Non-Thermal Astrophysics

Division Prof. Dr. Jim Hinton

Research in the division covers two main areas: 

  • high-energy astrophysics exploring the sources and acceleration processes of high-energy particles in the Universe, and
  • probing particle physics beyond the Standard Model.

Our high energy astrophysics research is based primarily on ground-based gamma-ray astronomy using atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and dense particle detector arrays to measure gamma rays emitted by high-energy particles in our Galaxy and beyond. The division has contributed major elements of the hardware of the H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescopes and the HAWC high-energy extension, and plays a significant role in preparing the next generation Cherenkov Telescope Array - CTA. The group is also heavily engaged with research and development towards the Southern Wide-field-of-view Gamma-ray Observatory – SWGO. Associated research groups cover the theory and phenomenology of high energy astrophysics, plasma astrophysics and infrared astrophysics.

Exploring the properties of neutrinos, and in particular the search for neutrinoless double-beta decay, is another major activity of the division. We play a leading role in the LEGEND project at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory, following up on the success of its predecessor GERDA

In the area of accelerator-based particle physics projects we are members of the LHCb collaboration, focusing on the study of heavy-quark production and decays, with emphasis on the phase space relevant to both particle physics and cosmic-ray physics.

Research Fields

Associated research activities

News

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‘FestKolloquium’ in honour of Werner Hofmann and Felix Aharonian

On Dec 8th, a ‘FestKolloquium’ was held in honour of Werner Hofmann and Felix Aharonian, two giants in the field of very-high-energy astrophysics.…

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20 years H.E.S.S. telescopes in Namibia

With a ceremony on 18 October and an open day the following Sunday, the H.E.S.S. collaboration celebrated the 20th anniversary of the commissioning of…

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Westerlund 1: a powerful cosmic-ray accelerator

Since more than 100 years, we know that cosmic rays – charged particles – are accelerated to extremely high energies in the Milky Way, our galaxy. And…

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