Aktuelle Termine

19. Woche 2021


Mittwoch, 12.05.

Gentner Colloquium for Astroparticle Physics

Zeit, Ort:

11:15 Uhr, Zoom

Redner:

Dr. Harald Lück (Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Hannover)

Titel:

The Einstein Telescope - listening to the murmurs of the universe (status and prospects)

LINK: https://zoom.us/j/99305762152?pwd=UW9UN1NCckM2bkdMNHhZU0JjMjNOQT09 // Meeting ID: 993 0576 2152 Passcode: 504719

Seminar Stored and Cooled Ions

Zeit, Ort:

15:00 Uhr, Central seminar room, library building

Redner:

Tim Sailer, MPIK

Titel:

Coupled ions in a Penning trap: A new measurement technique

Zoom Online Seminar. Please contact Gabi Weese (sekretariat.blaum@mpi-hd.mpg.de) to get access data

20. Woche 2021


Montag, 17.05.

Seminar Dynamik und Struktur von Atomen und Molekülen

Zeit, Ort:

09:30 Uhr, https://zoom.us/j/94852769442?pwd=cVNpRVpwMVVYRy9ZS2paUG1hcWFJdz09

Redner:

Maximilian Hartmann, Excited atoms & molecules in strong fields

Titel:

Attosecond dynamics of strong field ionization in xenon

Meeting-ID: 948 5276 9442Kenncode: 197160

Particle and Astroparticle Theory Seminar

Zeit, Ort:

16:30 Uhr, https://zoom.us/j/98873545634?pwd=ZjNlRGloUEVzRDdYdjlNMWFpYldpUT09

Redner:

Prof. Patrick Huber (Virginia Tech.)

Titel:

Sterile neutrinos: fact or fiction?

Hints for a forth neutrino have been persistent for more than two decades, firstencountered at accelerator experiments. In 2011, a re-evaluation of reactorneutrino fluxes gave rise to the reactor anti-neutrino anomaly, which can beinterpreted as a evidence for a forth neutrino. In this talk, I will review theoverall state of affairs and explain why the data from reactor experimentsremains inconclusive.

Dienstag, 18.05.

Seminar Theoretische Quantendynamik

Zeit, Ort:

11:15 Uhr, Zoom

Redner:

Oliver Diekmann, MPIK

Titel:

Tailoring artificial x-ray few-level systems (online seminar)

LINK: https://zoom.us/j/94017339467?pwd=jaYZQt2bNkgDq0ia2t53CFvj6kaX6Q \\ MEETING ID: 94017339467 \\ PASSWORD: 153366

Mittwoch, 19.05.

Bothe-Kolloquium

Zeit, Ort:

16:00 Uhr, https://zoom.us/j/92548552219?pwd=UCs5RFVlcGpzZWdpb0ZhYUUxUWdkZz09

Redner:

Dr. Stefano M. Cavaletto, University of California, Irvine

Titel:

Monitoring molecular coherences by time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy with stochastic free-electron-laser pulses

X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) relying on the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism generate stochastic x-ray pulses lacking phase control. This has represented a major bottleneck, since most time-resolved multidimensional nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy schemes are based on sequences of coherent phase-controlled pulses. We show that suitable correlation signals averaged over independent realizations of stochastic FEL pulses can retrieve the same joint temporal and spectral resolution of signals with phase-controlled pulses [1]. This is demonstrated both for Raman spectroscopy and diffraction signals, and can be extended to additional complex multidimensional nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy experiments.[1] S. M. Cavaletto, D. Keefer, and S. Mukamel, Phys. Rev. X 11, 011029 (2021).

Donnerstag, 20.05.

Teekolloquium

Zeit, Ort:

16:00 Uhr, https://zoom.us/j/97726408385?pwd=SG1odkprSC91T01HRFl0amtEa1QxZz09

Redner:

Associate Professor Gabriel D. Orebi Gann - University California Berkeley

Titel:

Let there be light: unlocking the secrets of the universe with neutrinos

Meeting-ID: 977 2640 8385Kenncode: 291628Neutrinos are some of the most fascinating particles that occur in nature. Over one billion times lighter than the proton, the neutrino was once thought to be massless and to travel at the speed of light. The Nobel-Prize winning discovery of neutrino oscillations told us that neutrinos have non-zero mass, which opens up the unique possibility of the neutrino being its own antiparticle, known as a Majorana fermion. This property could help explain the dominance of matter in our Universe. This talk will discuss the benefits of different experimental approaches for using light to observe neutrinos, and the physics thus enabled: from directional Cherenkov detectors like the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, to its successor experiment, SNO+, which uses scintillation to probe low-energy interactions. We will then discuss technological advances that could enable a new kind of hybrid neutrino experiment: the THEIA detector would be capable of combining both signals to achieve unprecedented physics reach across low- and high-energy neutrino and rare-event physics.