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Neutrino 2018 – Timetable
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Sunday, 3rd June 2018
16h00 Registration and Welcome Reception
21h00 End of the Day
Monday, 4th June 2018
08h00 Registration
09h00 Opening Session/Accelerator Neutrinos 1 Chair: J. Schneps
10 Welcome Manfred Lindner Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik Slides
35+5 Opening Talk Eligio Lisi INFN, Bari
Abstract

Opening Talk

A general overview of neutrino physics topics will be presented, highlighting achievements, expectations, and connections.
Slides
25+5 T2K Status, Results, and Plans Morgan Wascko Imperial College
Abstract

T2K Status, Results, and Plans

T2K is an accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino experiment in which a muon neutrino beam produced by JPARC in Tokai is sent 295 km across Japan to the Super-Kamiokande detector to study neutrino oscillations via the disappearance of muon neutrinos and the appearance of electron neutrinos. The T2K beam can be run in neutrino or antineutrino mode. Since the start of operations in 2010, T2K has conclusively observed muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations, and performed the most precise measurement of the muon neutrino and antineutrino disappearance parameters. These measurements are a new probe of unknown physics, including the possibility of observing CP violation in neutrino mixing.
T2K has collected new neutrino and antineutrino data since the Neutrino 2016 conference. In this talk, we will present updated neutrino and antineutrino oscillation results with new data, and touch on other physics topics. Finally, the future prospects of the experiment, including the extension of the T2K program, T2K-II, will be presented.
Slides
25+5 NOvA Results and Prospects Mayly Sanchez Iowa State University
Abstract

NOvA Results and Prospects

NOvA is one of the World's leading long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments in operation. It uses the 700 kW NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab directed towards northern Minnesota in the US. Two functionally identical scintillator-based detectors are placed at off-axis locations, separated by 810 km, largely canceling many systematic uncertainties for neutrino oscillation measurements. By analyzing neutrino charged-current interactions in these detectors, the NOvA experiment studies muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance to probe still undetermined physics parameters, such as the neutrino mass ordering, CP violation and the octant of the large mixing angle. NOvA can also study the disappearance of all three known neutrino flavors by analyzing neutral current interactions, thus enabling searches for physics beyond the three-flavor paradigm, such as mixing with light sterile neutrinos. In this talk, I will present the latest NOvA results including the complete neutrino data sample taken to date, and the first results using new antineutrino data collected by the experiment since February 2017. Future running plans and physics reach will be discussed.
Slides
10h50 Coffee break
11h20 Accelerator Neutrinos 2 Chair: A. de Roeck
17+3 Recent Results from MINOS and MINOS+ Adam Aurisano University of Cincinnati
Abstract

Recent Results from MINOS and MINOS+

The MINOS experiment was a long-baseline, two-detector experiment, magnetized steel-scintillator detector. From 2005 to 2012, MINOS performed measurements of oscillations driven by the atmospheric frequency through observations of muon neutrino and muon antineutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance in the low-energy-mode NuMI beam produced at Fermilab. From 2013 to 2016, the MINOS+ experiment took data using the MINOS detectors with the NuMI beam in a higher-energy mode allowing for a precise determination of the shape of the first atmospheric oscillation maximum. In this talk, I will show a new analysis of the three flavor paradigm using the full MINOS and MINOS+ datasets, including a 67% increase in medium energy data and a 25% increase in exposure to atmospheric neutrinos. I will also show searches for phenomena beyond the three-flavor paradigm, including a search for 3+1 sterile oscillations at both long and short baselines using a covariance matrix fit to achieve systematic uncertainty cancellation.
Slides
25+5 DUNE: Status and Science Elizabeth Worcester Brookhaven National Laboratory
Abstract

DUNE: Status and Science

The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) has a broad physics program that includes determining the neutrino mass hierarchy, measuring delta_CP with sufficient precision to discover leptonic CP violation, making precise measurements of the oscillation parameters governing electron neutrino appearance and muon neutrino disappearance, detecting neutrinos from a core-collapse supernova, searching for baryon number violating processes such as nucleon decay and neutron-antineutron oscillation, and searching for other physics beyond the Standard Model. The experiment is enabled by a high-power, broadband neutrino beam covering a baseline of 1300 km from Fermilab to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota, a high-precision near detector, and a large liquid argon time-project chamber (LArTPC) far detector. We present the status of the DUNE experiment, including the experiment design, the status of two large-scale far detector prototypes under construction at CERN, and the experiment's physics potential.
Slides
25+5 Hyper-Kamiokande Masato Shiozawa University of Tokyo/ICRR
Abstract

Hyper-Kamiokande

The Hyper-Kamiokande or Hyper-K, as a straightforward extension of the Super-Kamiokande, will provide major new capabilities to make new discoveries in particle and astroparticle physics thanks to an order of magnitude increase in detector mass and improvements in photon-detection system along with the envisioned J-PARC Megawatt-class neutrino beam. The Hyper-K and J-PARC neutrino beam measurement of neutrino oscillation is more likely to provide a 5-sigma discovery of CP violation than any other existing experiment. Hyper-K will also be the world leader for nucleon decays. The sensitivity to the partial lifetime of protons for the decay modes of p→ e+ π0 is expected to exceed 1035 years. Finally, the astrophysical neutrino program involves precision measurement of solar neutrinos and their matter effects, high-statistical Supernova burst and Supernova relic neutrinos. The Hyper-K is a priority project listed in the Roadmap2017 of the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). The principal project milestones include: Construction to start as early as in 2019, and Start data taking in 2026.
Slides
12h40 Lunch break
14h15 Accelerator Neutrinos 3 Chair: S. Wojcicki
25+5 Other future accelerator projects Mauro Mezzetto INFN Padova
Abstract

Other future accelerator projects

Besides the major proposals for future long baseline (LBL) experiments, several other activities are in progress worldwide. They include alternative configurations for LBL experiments, ancillary setups for LBL experiments, physics measurements not covered by LBL experiments and new concepts for accelerator neutrino beams. The talk will provide a review of these initiatives discussing their status and their possible developments.
Slides
17+3 Hadron Production Measurements for Long-Baseline Neutrino Beams Alysia Marino University of Colorado
Abstract

Hadron Production Measurements for Long-Baseline Neutrino Beams

Long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiments rely on the neutrinos from the decays of hadrons produced in hadron-nucleus interactions. Uncertainties in the hadron production yields from these interactions dominate the neutrino flux uncertainties in these beams. This talk will review the currently available hadron production data that is relevant for accelerator beams. It will highlight recent results from CERN's NA61/SHINE experiment, which has produced measurements that strongly constrain the neutrino and anti-neutrino fluxes in the T2K experiment and is currently producing measurements to improve modeling of the fluxes for the Fermilab long-baseline neutrino program. The talk will also present the prospects for future hadron production measurements in NA61/SHINE and other projects.
Slides
17+3 MINERvA: Illuminating the Interaction of Neutrinos with Bound Nucleons in the Nuclear Environment Dan Ruterbories University of Rochester
Abstract

MINERvA: Illuminating the Interaction of Neutrinos with Bound Nucleons in the Nuclear Environment

Based in the NuMI beam line at Fermi National Laboratory, the on-axis MINERvA experiment measures the characteristics of neutrino interactions on nucleons and partons in the nuclear environment. Using both neutrino and anti-neutrino datasets from two different beam energy tunes as well as various nuclear targets it probes the nuclear environment to better understand A dependent initial and final state nuclear effects on processes ranging from low W, so called quasi-elastic, to high W deep inelastic processes and everything in between. The most recent results from the MINERvA experiment will be shown as well as a look to the future.
Slides
17+3 New Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements in T2K Federico Sánchez IFAE
Abstract

New Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements in T2K

We describe how the T2K near detectors are used to measure the neutrino interaction cross sections necessary for T2K to reach the final precision for its νe-appearance and νμ-disappearance results. We then present the new near detector cross section results, for charged current inclusive and exclusive scattering and neutral current pi0 production. We will also describe new observables developed recently to increase sensitivity to the cross-section model and the most recent developments on the neutrino-nucleus cross-section modelling by the T2K collaboration. The T2K Near Detector upgrade program and its relation to uncertainties in cross-section modelling will be also discussed.
Slides
15h45 Coffee break
16h15 Accelerator Neutrinos 4/New Detection Techniques Chair: S. Ragazzi
21+4 Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions and Long-Baseline Experiments Ulrich Mosel Giessen University
Abstract

Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions and Long-Baseline Experiments

In long-baseline experiments the extraction of neutrino mixing parameters and the CP-violating phase requires an event-by-event reconstruction of the neutrino energy from the final state of a neutrino-nucleus reaction. Since all such experiments use nuclear targets this reconstruction requires detailed knowledge of the neutrino reactions with bound nucleons and of the final state interactions of produced hadrons with the nuclear environment. In this talk I will summarize what we know about interactions of neutrinos with nuclei and will stress the similarity with electron-nucleus interactions as a necessary testing ground for all neutrino generators. I will then point out that widely used generators are often built on outdated nuclear physics. In particular for the all-important final state interactions quantum-kinetic transport theory is nowadays mature enough to be used also for the analysis of neutrino long-baseline experiments. Comparisons of transport-theoretical calculations with recent experiments at T2K and MINERvA and predictions for DUNE will be shown to illustrate this point.
Slides
21+4 New Detection Techniques — Advanced Scintillator Detectors Michael Wurm JGU Mainz
Abstract

New Detection Techniques — Advanced Scintillator Detectors

While liquid-scintillator detectors have been commonly known for their virtues in the detection of low-energy neutrinos, they have been assumed to be limited to MeV neutrino energies based on their lack of directional and track reconstruction capabilities.
However, recent years have seen a rapid development of advanced detection concepts and novel reconstruction methods that greatly enhance directional event reconstruction and the resolution of complex event topologies in scintillator targets. This talk will review a selection of advanced scintillator detector concepts and their scientific potential in low-energy neutrino observation and long-baseline oscillation physics: Water-based liquid scintillators combined with fast light sensors that offer the potential to distinguish Cherenkov from scintillation photons; doped scintillators with enhanced neutrino detection capabilities; new ideas on optical imaging of scintillation events; and segmented detectors for fine-grained event resolution.
Slides
17h05 Poster Prize Competition: Monday Finals Chair: K. Eitel
30 Poster Finals Monday
List of Finalists

Poster Finals Monday

Short oral presentations (2 minutes 40 seconds each) of 10 selected posters of poster session 1. Finalists for the poster prize:
Wall #003: Christian KARL MPP Munich Analysis Strategies for the KATRIN Experiment
Wall #009: Tom KIECK U Mainz Production, Separation and Implantation of 136-Ho for Neutrino Mass Measurements
Wall #030: Yuber Ferney PEREZ GONZALEZ Universidade de São Paulo Impact of Beyond the Standard Model Physics in the Detection of the Cosmic Neutrino Background
Wall #042: Birgit SCHNEIDER TU Dresden Double beta decay of Ge-76 into excited states of Se-76 in GERDA
Wall #053: Julieta GRUSZKO MIT NuDot: Double-Beta Decay with Direction Reconstruction in Liquid Scintillator
Wall #088: Ana Paula VIZCAYA HERNÁNDEZ Carnegie Mellon Detecting light ions and electrons with TRIMS silicon detectors
Wall #120: Laura DOMINE Stanford University/SLAC Applying Deep Neural Network Techniques for LArTPC Data Reconstruction
Wall #131: Marjon MOULAI MIT Sterile Neutrino Decay
Wall #197: Aurelie BONHOMME DPhN/IRFU/CEA-Saclay Measurement of the neutrino rates in the STEREO experiment
Wall #208: Ryan DORRILL University of Hawaii NuLat: A Novel Design for a Reactor Anti-Neutrino Detector
Slides
17h35 Poster Session 1
20h00 End of the Day
Tuesday, 5th June 2018
09h00 Reactor Neutrinos 1 Chair: K. Scholberg
21+4 Status of Reactor Antineutrino Flux Predictions Anna Hayes LANL
Abstract

Status of Reactor Antineutrino Flux Predictions

I present an overreview of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these and their associated uncertainties are crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to-date have been determined by either conversion of measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that makeup the spectra using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to beta-decay plague both methods, and I provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.
Slides
25+5 Latest Results from Daya Bay Juan Pedro Ochoa-Ricoux Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
Abstract

Latest Results from Daya Bay

The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment has been collecting data since late 2011 and has already accumulated the largest sample of reactor antineutrinos to date. The experiment’s unique configuration of eight identically designed detectors placed underground at different baselines from six 2.9 GWth nuclear reactors allows it to study a wide range of topics of interest in neutrino physics. In this talk I will review the latest results from Daya Bay on different fronts, with a focus on the most recent measurement of the oscillation parameters that drive the disappearance of electron antineutrinos at short baselines.
Slides
17+3 New Results from the Double Chooz Experiment Christian Buck Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik
Abstract

New Results from the Double Chooz Experiment

The Double Chooz reactor antineutrino experiment presents latest results using data taken with its two detectors. The average baseline to the two reactor cores of the nuclear power plant in Chooz, France, is about 400 m for the near and about 1 km for the far detector. An identical detector design and almost isoflux conditions allow for a precision measurement of the neutrino mixing angle θ13. Unique techniques in the selection of inverse beta decay events and background discrimination are shown, optimized for high antineutrino detection efficiency and improved systematics.
Furthermore, the measured energy spectrum of the reactor antineutrinos is compared to predictions. The observed spectral distortions are discussed. Our recent analysis of the near Double Chooz detector data also allows for a precise determination of the mean reactor neutrino interaction rate. The detected antineutrino rate is compared to the results of other experiments and prediction models.
Slides
17+3 Recent Results from RENO Intae Yu Sungkyunkwan University
Abstract

Recent Results from RENO

The Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation (RENO) has been taking data from August, 2011 using the two identical near and far detectors at Hanbit Nuclear Power Plant in Korea. The neutrino mixing angle θ13 and the squared mass difference Δm2ee have been successfully measured by observing the energy dependent disappearance of reactor antineutrinos tagged by neutron capture by gadolinium. In this talk, we present improved results of θ13 and Δm2ee measurements and the first measured value of θ13 using neutron capture on hydrogen. We also report results on the evolution of reactor antineutrino flux and a search for light sterile neutrino mixing.
Slides
10h35 Coffee break
11h05 Reactor Neutrinos 2/Atmospheric Neutrinos Chair: D. Sinclair
21+4 Status and Prospects of the JUNO Experiment Bjoern Wonsak University of Hamburg
Abstract

Status and Prospects of the JUNO Experiment

The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) is a 20 kton multi-purpose liquid scintillator detector being built in a dedicated underground laboratory in China and expected to start data taking in 2021. Its main physics goal is the determination of the neutrino mass ordering using electron anti-neutrinos from two nuclear power plants at a baseline of about 53 km. With an unprecedented energy resolution of 3% at 1 MeV, JUNO will be able to determine the mass ordering with a significance of 3-4 sigma within six years of running. In addition, JUNO will also perform other important measurements in neutrino physics and astrophysics, such as estimating the solar oscillation parameters and the atmospheric mass splitting down to an accuracy of 1% or better.
In this talk JUNO's physics potential will be described, the status of its construction will be reviewed and a small excursion into its rich R&D program will be given.
Slides
21+4 Atmospheric Neutrino Results from Super-Kamiokande Yoshinari Hayato ICRR, Univ. of Tokyo
Abstract

Atmospheric Neutrino Results from Super-Kamiokande

The Super-Kamiokande experiment started its operation in 1996 and accumulated atmospheric neutrino events over the last 20 years. We have performed the determinations of neutrino oscillation mixing parameters, a study on mass hierarchy and leptonic CP violation together with the study of tau neutrinos using the data. In this talk, we will report the new results using the atmospheric neutrino sammples and future prospects.
Slides
30+5 Latest results from IceCube and ANTARES Tyce DeYoung Michigan State University
Abstract

Latest results from IceCube and ANTARES

High energy neutrino telescopes such as IceCube, ANTARES, and the future KM3NeT can measure flavor oscillations using large atmospheric neutrino data sets. These observations are highly complementary to accelerator and reactor neutrino measurements, as they probe higher neutrino energies and a wide range of baselines, including substantial matter column densities. This enables probes of the unitarity of the PMNS matrix and searches for new physics, including sterile neutrinos and NSI, in addition to measurements of the atmospheric mixing parameters. The latest results of these analyses from IceCube and ANTARES will be presented.
Slides
12h30 Lunch break
14h00 Solar Neutrinos Chair: T. Kirsten
21+4 Superkamiokande (solar) Motoyasu Ikeda ICRR, Univ. of Tokyo
Abstract

Superkamiokande (solar)

The latest result of solar neutrino measurements with Super-Kamiokande will be reported. Super-K is a 50 kton water Cherenkov detector at Kamioka mine in Japan. Since 1996, we have achieved 5695 days of total livetime for our solar neutrino measurements. This large volume and long livetime enable us to make precise measurements of the boron-8 solar neutrino flux, spectrum, and oscillation parameters, as well as the flux's stability over a period of 22 years, which corresponds to two complete solar cycles. This talk will also briefly discuss SK-Gd, a new phase of SK with gadolinium-loaded water to enhance neutron tagging efficiency; the status and schedule of SK-Gd will be presented.
Slides
21+4 Solar neutrino from pp-chain and other results of Borexino Oleg Smirnov  JINR Dubna
Abstract

Solar neutrino from pp-chain and other results of Borexino

The Borexino experiment is a large volume liquid scintillator detector installed at the LNGS. Its characteristic feature is exteremely low backround in sub-MeV region, providing an oportunity for a vast physics program, far beyond the original proposal. The data obtained in the Phase II of the program, after the additional purification of the liquid scintillator, were used to perform the first spectroscopical measurement of the pp-neutrino flux, and significantly improve the precision of measurement of other solar neutrino fluxes from the pp-chain of solar reactions, including first robust measurement of the pep-neutrino flux. The Borexino is one of two detectors that registered geo-neutrino, antineutrino of terrestrial origin. These and other important results obtained with Borexino Phase-II data will be discussed. The perspectives of the final stage of the Borexino solar neutrino program that are centered on the goal of measuring the CNO neutrinos will be outlined.
Slides
21+4 The Future of Solar Neutrino Physics Shaomin Chen Tsinghua University, Beijing
Abstract

The Future of Solar Neutrino Physics

Solar neutrinos play a key role not only in neutrino physics, but also in stellar and solar physics. In this presentation, we will give a review of future neutrino experiments with either the deeper overburden or larger target mass or state-of-the-art techniques in attempt to provide both directional and energy information for solar neutrinos. Special focuses will be given on the research challenges and opportunities confronting the solar neutrino physics experiments.
Slides
21+4 Solar Models and Neutrinos Ilidio Lopes IST, Universidade de Lisboa
Abstract

Solar Models and Neutrinos

In this talk, I will review the current modelling status of the solar interior focusing on the topics such as helioseismology, metallicity, differential rotation and gravity modes research. Moreover, I will discuss how new neutrino measurements can help us to improve our modelling of the solar interior, and reversely how can the Sun help us to define the new properties of neutrinos.
Slides
15h40 Coffee break
16h10 Phenomenology and Theoretical Interpretations Chair: S. Petcov
25+5 The Global Three-Neutrino Picture before DUNE Mariam Tórtola IFIC (Univ. Valencia - CSIC)
Abstract

The Global Three-Neutrino Picture before DUNE

In this talk I will describe the status of global analyses to neutrino oscillation data in the three-flavour framework. I will focus on the current knowledge of the oscillation parameters as well as on the improvements that can be expected in the near future. I will also discuss the implications of these results on the measurement of the neutrino mass scale and the searches for CP violation and neutrinoless double beta decay.
Slides
21+4 Theories of Neutrino Masses Lisa Everett University of Wisconsin
Abstract

Theories of neutrino masses

The discovery of neutrino oscillations and the subsequent measurements of the neutrino mass-squared differences and the lepton mixing angles over the past decade(s) have reinvigorated the quest to elucidate the physics that underlies the origin of the fermion masses in the Standard Model. This talk will provide a summary of the current status of theoretical approaches to the origin of neutrino masses and lepton mixing parameters, and their prospects in the present and forthcoming era of precision neutrino experiments.
Slides
17h05 Evening Break (Admission to Public Lecture starting 17h45)
18h00 Public Lecture
60 Physics Show Stella Nova Entertainment
Abstract

Physics Show

The duo Stella Nova presents stunning and spectacular physics experiments, fascinating the young and the old. Combining science and entertainment in a unique way, you can see rockets rise, vortices form, lightning strike and ballons freeze. No prior knowledge of physics is required to follow the interactive science show.
60 Neutrinos and You: What are they and why should you care? Arthur B. McDonald Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada
Abstract

Neutrinos and You: What are they and why should you care?

Neutrinos are the least known of the fundamental sub-atomic particles because they barely ever interact with matter. Although there are billions of neutrinos from the Sun passing through you every second, roughly once in your lifetime one will interact with an atom in your body, changing it into a different atom and you will not even notice. However, with enormous detectors deep underground or under the Antarctic ice, researchers have begun to understand their properties and place them within the Laws of Physics at the most basic level. We are discovering that neutrinos have many properties that are significant for humans: Solar neutrinos tell us in detail how the Sun burns, explaining the nuclear reactions that produce the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen from which we are made and helping scientists in the development of fusion power here on Earth; Neutrinos influence how our Universe has evolved since the Big Bang; High Energy Neutrinos are astronomical messengers from the farthest reaches of space; New measurements with accelerators can help us to understand why we live in a Universe dominated by the matter from which we are made. Come along for a layperson’s ramble with these fascinating particles, their importance for our very existence and their value for measurements here on Earth.
Slides
20h00 End of the Day
Wednesday, 6th June 2018
09h00 Double Beta Decay 1 Chair: E. Fiorini
17+3 Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay with EXO-200 and nEXO Giorgio Gratta Stanford University
Abstract

Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay with EXO-200 and nEXO

Large and homogeneous TPCs using enriched liquid xenon have proven to be excellent tools in the search for neutrinoless double beta decay with ultra-low background and state of the art sensitivity. I will report on the physics results obtained with EXO-200, a 200kg detector currently taking data, and on the plans for nEXO, a 5-tonne detector with sufficient sensitivity to entirely cover the inverted hierarchy region.
Slides
17+3 KamLAND-Zen Azusa Gando RCNS, Tohoku University
Abstract

KamLAND-Zen

KamLAND-Zen searches for neutrinoless double beta (0nbb) decay with Xe-136 loaded liquid scintillator. Results from “KamLAND-Zen 400” are based upon data collected from 2011 to 2015 and we obtained the most stringent lower limit for 0nbb decay half-life of 136Xe, 1.07*10^26 yrs at 90% C.L. Next phase, “KamLAND-Zen800” is in preparation and will start data taking in this year. We will report the current status. Future prospects of the experiment, “KamLAND2-Zen” is also presented.
Slides
17+3 New results from GERDA Phase II Anna Julia Zsigmond Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich
Abstract

New results from GERDA Phase II

The observation of neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay would establish both the violation of lepton number conservation and the Majorana nature of the neutrino, as well as constrain the neutrinomass hierarchy and scale. GERDA reached an important milestone in the search for 0νββ decay with ⁷⁶Ge by achieving a half-life sensitivity of 10²⁶ years. This is made possible by the background-free conditions in GERDA and by a factor of two increase in exposure since the last data release in 2017. New results will be presented together with the details of background reduction techniques.
Slides
17+3 New Results from the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Experiment Vincente Guiseppe University of South Carolina
Abstract

New Results from the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Experiment

The MAJORANA Collaboration is searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay in Ge-76 through an array of p-type, point-contact Ge detectors. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is comprised of 44 kg (30 kg enriched in Ge-76) of Ge detectors split between two modules contained in a low background shield at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The initial goals of the DEMONSTRATOR include establishing the required background and scalability of a Ge-based, ton-scale experiment. The first detector module started low background data production in early 2016 and the second detector module was added in August 2016 to begin operation of the entire array. Our published results from an initial 10 kg-yr of open-data exposure set a half-life lower limit of 1.9x10^25 yr (90% C.L), achieved an unprecedented energy resolution of 2.5 keV FWHM at the double-beta decay Q value of 2039 keV, and measured a very low background rate in the lowest background configuration. Our next data release aims to cover up to 30 kg-yr of total exposure after unblinding. New results and an outlook from the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment will be presented.
Slides
10h20 Coffee break
10h50 Double Beta Decay 2 Chair: N. Smith
17+3 Latest Results from the CUORE Experiment Jonathan Ouellet MIT
Abstract

Latest Results from the CUORE Experiment

The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is the first bolometric experiment searching for neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) that has been able to reach the one-ton scale. The detector consists of an array of 988 TeO2 crystals arranged in a compact cylindrical structure of 19 towers. The construction of the experiment was completed in August 2016 with the installation of all towers in the cryostat. Following a cooldown, diagnostic, and optimization campaign, routine data-taking began in spring 2017. After the first two months of data taking, CUORE collected a total TeO2 exposure of 86.3 kg·yr with an average energy resolution of 7.7 keV FWHM and a background in the region of interest of 0.014 counts/(keV·kg·yr). With this dataset, CUORE placed a lower limit on the 130Te 0νββ half-life of > 1.3 × 1025 yr (90% C.L.). In this talk, we report on the latest evaluation of the CUORE background budget, and using this same 86.3 kg·yr dataset, we present the most precise measurement of the 130Te 0νββ half-life to date.
Slides
17+3 SNO+ Gabriel Orebi Gann UC Berkeley and LBNL
Abstract

SNO+

SNO+ is a large liquid scintillator based neutrino detector with a broad physics program, located in SNOLAB in Canada. The primary goal of SNO+ is a search for neutrinoless double beta decay from 130Te. SNO+ also has a broad program of low-energy physics including reactor neutrinos, solar neutrinos, geo neutrinos, and sensitivity to invisible modes of nucleon decay. SNO+ is currently filled with ultra-pure water and taking backgrounds data in preparation for scintillator fill this summer. This talk will present first results of background measurements in the water phase, a critical input to both NLDBD and other physics sensitivities.
Slides
25+5 The Mid and Long Term Future of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Andrea Giuliani CSNSM, Orsay and DiSAT, Como
Abstract

The Mid and Long Term Future of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

The search for neutrinoless double beta decay is more challenging than ever. None of the current experiments has the potential to explore the inverted-ordering region of the neutrino mass pattern, even in case of no quenching of the axial charge. In addition, we should be prepared to the fact that the ordering could be direct, as preliminarily suggested - with still low significance - by global analyses of neutrino oscillation experiments and by cosmology. Having in mind this demanding context, I will discuss the mid-term reaches of the current projects and the potential of their evolutions. I will present also new ideas that could provide a breakthrough at a longer time scale.
Slides
17+3 Double-beta-decay Matrix Elements and the Effective Value of Weak Axial Coupling Jouni Suhonen University of Jyväskylä
Abstract

Double-beta-decay Matrix Elements and the Effective Value of Weak Axial Coupling

The neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of atomic nuclei is a possible way to access the nature and mass of the neutrino. These unknown features of the neutrino can be tackled by the 0νββ-decay experiments. In a simplistic picture the rate of 0νββ decay depends on the second power of the double Gamow-Teller nuclear matrix element, M(0ν)GTGT, containing virtual transitions through various multipole states Jπ of the intermediate nucleus. The matrix element is multiplied by the second power of the effective (quenched) value, geffA, of the weak axial-vector coupling gA. The coupling geffA plays an extremely important role in determining the 0νββ-decay rate since the rate is proportional to its 4th power. The quenching issue has become very important in the neutrino-physics community due to its impact on the sensitivities of the present and future large-scale 0νββ-decay experiments. The effective value of gA can be studied in single beta decays of various kinds, as also in the nuclear muon capture. In these cases geffA determines the beta-decay half-lives and spectrum shapes of the emitted electrons/positrons. It also determines the muon-capture rates together with the (effective) induced pseudoscalar coupling. The effective value of the axial coupling can have a strong impact on the beta-spectrum shapes, on 0νββ-decay rates and, e.g., the analysis of the reactor-antineutrino anomaly.
Slides
12h20 Lunch break
14h00 Neutrino Astronomy 1 Chair: G. Anton
35+5 A View of the Universe with the IceCube and ANTARES Neutrino Telescopes Ignacio Taboada Georgia Institute of Technology
Abstract

A View of the Universe with the IceCube and ANTARES Neutrino Telescopes

Cosmic rays and neutrinos are intimately related. And though TeV-PeV astrophysical neutrinos have been observed, their sources and their relation to potential sources of cosmic rays remain unknown. Two current under-water/ice neutrino observatories, ANTARES and IceCube, have conducted numerous searches from potential neutrino sources. In this presentation I will describe the characteristics of the observed neutrino spectrum. I will showcase specific studies of potential neutrino sources of both galactic and extragalactic nature. I will review the multi-messenger aspect of the field, especially in relation to the search for electromagnetic counterparts to neutrino sources. Finally, I will describe real-time activities that enable the multi-messenger studies.
Slides
25+5 Reaching for the highest energy neutrinos Amy Connolly Ohio State University
Abstract

Reaching for the highest energy neutrinos

The optical Cerenkov technique has been tremendously successful for neutrino measurements up to now ~10 PeV. However, at higher energies, the neutrino fluxes become so low that km^2 detection areas are not enough, and other techniques are needed to cover areas of order 100 km^2 or more. I will give an overview of searches for radio emission from neutrino-induced showers, as well as the status of other exciting techniques being developed to measure neutrinos at the highest energies.
Slides
35+5 Multi messenger physics of astrophysical neutrinos and cosmic ray sources Peter Mészáros Pennsylvania State University
Abstract

Multi messenger physics of astrophysical neutrinos and cosmic ray sources

The expected relationship between the observed astrophysical high energy neutrinos and sources of high energy cosmic rays provides useful clues for inferring the required physical properties of their sources, whose specific nature is still debated. On the other hand, the poor positional localization afforded by both of these messengers can be off-set by observations of the gamma-rays co-produced along with the neutrinos, with the spectrum of the gamma-rays also providing important constraints. I will discuss the interplay between these messengers among themselves, as well as various possible candidate astrophysical sources and the prospects for identifying them.
Slides
15h50 Coffee break
16h20 Neutrino Astronomy 2 Chair: Ch. Spiering
35+5 Future neutrino telescopes in water and ice Uli Katz University of Erlangen-Nürnberg
Abstract

Future neutrino telescopes in water and ice

The discovery of high-energy cosmic neutrinos by IceCube in 2013 has made neutrino astronomy become reality. It is becoming clear, however, that exploiting its full scientific potential will require increasingly precise data, as well as full sky coverage. The future projects addressing these objectives - KM3NeT/ARCA, Baikal/GVD and the IceCube upgrade/Gen2 - and their science potential are discussed. A second thread of activities targeting lower-energy atmospheric neutrinos for oscillation studies, and in particular for the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy, is also presented. These projects - KM3NeT/ORCA, IceCube Upgrade/Gen2 - employ very similar detection technologies as their high-energy siblings and are expected to become operational within a few years from now.
Slides
17h00 Poster Prize Competition: Wednesday Finals Chair: E. Akhmedov
30 Poster Finals Wednesday
List of Finalists

Poster Finals Wednesday

Short oral presentations (2 minutes 40 seconds each) of 10 selected posters of poster session 2. Finalists for the poster prize:
Wall #001: Katsuki HIRAIDE ICRR, University of Tokyo Neutrino physics with the XMASS liquid xenon detector
Wall #023: Joseph JOHNSTON MIT Prospects for Exploring New Physics in Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering Experiments
Wall #035: Yuuki NAKANO Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, University of Tokyo Study for g-mode oscillations in the Sun using solar neutrino with Super-Kamiokande
Wall #043: Mathieu LAMOUREUX DPhP, IRFU, CEA Search for heavy neutrinos with the near detector ND280 of the T2K experiment
Wall #048: Simon BIENSTOCK LPNHE Studying the impact of neutrino cross-section mismodelling on the T2K oscillation analysis
Wall #082: Liudmila KOLUPAEVA JINR NOvA joint νeμ oscillation results in neutrino and antineutrino modes
Wall #114: Mark ROSS-LONERGAN Columbia University MicroBooNE tests of the MiniBooNE Low Energy Excess
Wall #134: Katarzyna FRANKIEWICZ National Center for Research Search for neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Earth core with the Super-Kamiokande detector
Wall #149: Susana MOLINA SEDGWICK University of Southampton Predictions for Right-Handed Neutrinos From the Littlest Seesaw and Leptogenesis
Wall #201: Chiara RIGHI Università degli studi dell'Insubria Blazars as neutrinos factories
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17h30 Poster Session 2
20h00 End of the Day
Thursday, 7th June 2018
09h00 Coherent Neutrino Scattering Chair: K. Heeger
21+4 The COHERENT Collaboration and the First Observation of Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering Grayson Rich University of Chicago
Abstract

The COHERENT Collaboration and the First Observation of Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

More than 40 years after its theoretical description, the process of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) has been observed for the first time by the COHERENT Collaboration. This observation was made using a 14.6-kg CsI[Na] detector located at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) of Oak Ridge National Lab, which provides the world's most intense source of pulsed neutrinos, produced by the decay of stopped pions. This talk will present details of the CsI[Na] detector system and associated characterizations in addition to the SNS facility, the analysis of the collected data, and background measurements made to inform the CEvNS observation. The importance of continued and complementary CEvNS measurements is discussed along with the breadth of physics sensitivity shown by the process, including connections to nuclear structure, astrophysics, dark sector physics, and other physics beyond the Standard Model.
Slides
21+4 The Status of CONUS Werner Maneschg Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik
Abstract

The Status of CONUS

The status of the CONUS coherent reactor neutrino scattering experiment will be presented.
Slides
21+4 Neutrino-nucleus Coherent Scattering with Reactor and Solar Neutrinos Henry Wong Academia Sinica, Taipei
Abstract

Neutrino-nucleus Coherent Scattering with Reactor and Solar Neutrinos

Neutrino-nucleus (νN) elastic scattering has been observed with neutrinos from decay-at-rest pions, in which the quantum-mechanical coherency effects are only partial. To probe full coherency, studies of νN scattering with lower energy neutrino sources would be necessary. We will review various projects pursuing this goal with solar (the "neutrino floor" to direct WIMP searches) and reactor neutrinos, discussing their experimental challenges, status and prospects.
Slides
21+4 Theoretical Implications of Coherent Neutrino Scattering Omar Miranda Cinvestav
Abstract

Theoretical Implications of Coherent Neutrino Scattering

The coherent elastic neutrino nucleus-scattering has been recently detected for the first time by the COHERENT collaboration. It is expected that this low-energy process will be measured with more precision by the same collaboration as well as by other experimental setups. I will discuss the phenomenological impact of these measurements for physics beyond the Standard Model as well as for precision tests of the Standard Model
Slides
10h40 Coffee break
11h10 Laboratory Neutrino Mass Determination/IUPAP Chair: H. Robertson
21+4 KATRIN: Toward a High-Precision Neutrino-Mass Determination with Tritium Diana Parno Carnegie Mellon University
Abstract

KATRIN: Toward a High-Precision Neutrino-Mass Determination with Tritium

Twenty years after the discovery of neutrino oscillations established non-zero neutrino mass, the absolute neutrino-mass scale remains unknown. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is designed to improve the current direct limit on this mass scale by an order of magnitude, with a projected sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2 at the 90% confidence level. To achieve this, KATRIN will perform high-precision spectroscopy of the endpoint region of the tritium beta-decay spectrum, using a high-intensity, windowless gaseous tritium source and a high-resolution electrostatic spectrometer. In this talk, I will review the theoretical basis for a tritium-based neutrino-mass measurement; explore some of the experimental challenges addressed by the KATRIN collaboration; and share early results from the commissioning of the experiment, including KATRIN's first tritium runs.
Slides
21+4 Determining the Electron Neutrino Mass with Ho-163 Loredana Gastaldo Heidelberg University
Abstract

Determining the Electron Neutrino Mass with Ho-163

Direct determination of the electron neutrino m(νe) and anti-neutrino mass m(νe) can be obtained by the analysis of electron capture and beta spectra respectively. In the last years experiments analyzing the 3H beta spectrum reached a limit on m(νe) of 2 eV. The upper limit on m(νe)is still two orders of magnitudes higher, at 225 eV. Two large collaborations, ECHo and HOLMES, aim to reach sub-eV sensitivity on m(νe) by analyzing the endpoint region of high statistics and high resolution calorimetrically measured 163Ho electron capture spectra. To perform such experiments, high purity 163Ho sources will be enclosed in a large number of low temperature micro-calorimeters which are readout using multiplexing techniques. In this talk, the experimental challenges to determine the electron neutrino mass using 163Ho will be discussed as well as the strategies developed by the two collaborations to overcome them. Theoretical description of the 163Ho spectrum will be examined along with methods to validate the proposed models. In conclusion, recent results obtained by the two collaborations will be presented.
Slides
17+3 Project 8: Progress Towards using Cyclotron Radiation Emission Spectroscopy on Atomic Tritium for a Neutrino Mass Measurement Gray Rybka University of Washington
Abstract

Project 8: Progress Towards using Cyclotron Radiation Emission Spectroscopy on Atomic Tritium for a Neutrino Mass Measurement

Project 8 has demonstrated Cyclotron Radiation Emission Spectroscopy (CRES) as a novel technique for performing electron spectroscopy. Applying this method to highest energy electrons from atomic tritium beta decay should lead to a direct neutrino mass measurement. I will present recent developments in CRES for precision electron energy measurements, performance of the Project 8 prototype, and outline outline a path toward a viable atomic tritium source.
Slides
10 IUPAP Neutrino Panel Ken Long Imperial College

Slides
12h30 Excursions
River Cruise on the Neckar
12h30 – Back Entrance, Pier in Front of Venue
Lunch on the Boat
Visit of the KATRIN Experiment
12h40 – Back Entrance
Lunch Boxes on the Bus
Guided City Tour of Heidelberg
13h30 – Group A, Main Entrance
14h00 – Group B, Main Entrance
Lunch Boxes at Main Entrance
17h00 Evening Break
18h30 Conference Banquet (Admission starting 17h45)
max 01h00 Open End
Friday, 8th June 2018
09h00 Theory Chair: M. Tanimoto
21+4 LHC tests of low scale neutrino mass generation Bhupal Dev Washington University, St. Louis
Abstract

LHC tests of low scale neutrino mass generation

The current status and future prospects of testing the low-scale seesaw mechanism of neutrino mass generation at the energy frontier will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on the ongoing searches at the 13 TeV LHC. Seesaw models both within the SM gauge group and in extended gauge theories will be covered. In each case, we will summarize the current limits and the future sensitivity for the extra fermion, gauge and/or scalar fields.
Slides
25+5 Neutrino Mass Models and their Connections with other Physics Beyond the Standard Model Raymond Volkas The University of Melbourne
Abstract

Neutrino Mass Models and their Connections with other Physics Beyond the Standard Model

Through the use of three case studies, I will explore the possible connections between neutrino mass models and baryogenesis via leptogenesis, Higgs physics, dark matter, the strong-CP problem, and the currently tantalising flavour anomalies. This will highlight the theoretical importance of uncovering the origin of neutrino mass generation, and argue for the relevance of a broad experimental program in the quest to reveal the mechanism.
Slides
21+4 Rare Decays with Lepton Flavor Julian Heeck Université Libre de Bruxelles
Abstract

Rare Decays with Lepton Flavor

Processes that violate the seemingly accidental global symmetries of the Standard Model provide a perfect hunting ground for new physics, examples being proton decay (violating baryon number), neutrinoless double beta decay (violating total lepton number), and lepton-flavor-violating decays. We will review such rare decays and classify them according to their lepton flavor information. The violation of lepton-flavor universality, as recently hinted at by LHCb's measurements of B-meson decays, will be discussed as well.
Slides
21+4 New neutrino phenomena Danny Marfatia University of Hawaii at Manoa
Abstract

New neutrino phenomena

I will describe the phenomenology of some new physics scenarios.
Slides
10h45 Coffee break
11h15 Sterile Neutrinos and Interpretations 1 Chair: A. Barabash
17+3 Detection of reactor neutrinos with DANSS: results of one-year operation Viatcheslav Egorov JINR, Dubna
Abstract

Detection of reactor neutrinos with DANSS: results of one-year operation

Detector of the reactor neutrino DANSS consists of 2500 intercrossing polystyrene-based plastic scintillator strips (100x4x1 cm) with the total mass of 1.1 tn. The light signal is read out with 2500 individual SiPMs and with 50 conventional compact PMTs via WLS fibers, thus providing 3D space pattern of each event. The detector does not contain dangerous liquids and therefore has no safety restrictions on location close to an industrial reactor. It is mounted just under the cauldron of the 3 GW_th reactor WWER-1000 of Kalinin NPP (Russia) on a special lifting platform which varies the distance to the reactor core from 10.7 to 12.7 m within few minutes once per 2-3 days. Due to such location, DANSS is perfectly shielded against cosmic neutrons by 50 mwe of reactor body, cooling pond and other hydrogen-containing elements of the building. As a result, DANSS detects about 5,000 IBD events per day with a background at the level of few percent. In addition to the reactor monitoring, DANSS is used to search for short-range neutrino oscillation to a steryle state. The data analysis consists in comparison of the neutrino energy spectra measured at different distances, it does not use any theoretically calculated spectrum and therefore is completely model-independent; systematic errors caused by long-term variation of the reactor fuel and detector efficiency are eliminated as well. In one year of the detector operation we have collected more than 1,000,000 IBD events and could exclude a big part of steryle neutrino parameters region. In particular, the Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly optimum point is excluded with a confidence level higher than 5σ.
Slides
17+3 NEOS result and prospects Yoomin Oh Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon
Abstract

NEOS result and prospects

The NEOS experiment measured the inverse beta decay prompt energy spectrum at 24 m distance from a 2.8 GWt commercial reactor core. Constraints on the active-to-sterile neutrino oscillation parameters have been updated by the experimental result comparing with the Daya Bay spectrum. An extended measurement which covers a full burnup cycle will begin this Summer. By measuring the evolution of the spectrum along with the fuel compsition change from a sole reactor core, we hope to figure out the origin of the flux and spectral anomalies.
Slides
17+3 Latest Results of the STEREO Experiment Jacob Lamblin Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LPSC
Abstract

Latest Results of the STEREO Experiment

The average neutrino rate of previous neutrino oscillation experiments at short distance from reactors shows a deficit of neutrinos with respect to predictions. This deficit, known as the Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly (RAA), could be explained either by incomplete input in the flux predictions or by the existence of a new neutrino state, a light sterile neutrino. The STEREO experiment aims at answering this question. Located at ten meters from the compact nuclear core of the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in France, the STEREO detector is longitudinally divided in six identical cells filled with Gd-loaded liquid scintillator. Via the inverse beta decay reaction, it allows to measure the antineutrino energy spectrum at six distances from the core. The comparison of the energy spectra offers an unambiguous test of the oscillation to the hypothetical sterile neutrino. Since the end of 2016 when the detector started to take data, more than 130 days of data with reactor in operation have been accumulated. Moreover, more than 150 days with reactor stopped, essential for cosmic background measurements, have been acquired. The detector performances in terms of detector response and energy reconstruction meet the initial expectations. Thanks to an efficient detector shielding and dedicated analysis methods, the background could be reduced to reach a signal to background ratio close to 1 with about 400 neutrinos detected per day. To avoid the dependence on spectrum predictions and to get rid of systematic uncertainties related to the flux normalization, the first oscillation analysis is based on spectra ratios using the first cell as a reference.
Slides
17+3 PROSPECT: The Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment Thomas J. Langford Yale University
Abstract

PROSPECT: The Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment

PROSPECT is a short-baseline reactor antineutrino experiment designed to search for eV-scale sterile neutrino oscillations and measure the 235U antineutrino energy spectrum from the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Deployed in early 2018, the 4ton, segmented, 6Li-loaded liquid scintillator detector began commissioning in March of this year. The detector consists of 154 segments that span a baseline of 7-9m from the compact highly enriched uranium core, enabling coverage of a wide range of oscillation parameter space. Full-scale prototypes have demonstrated excellent energy resolution and pulse-shape discrimination that will reject cosmogenic backgrounds and produce an unparalleled measurement of the 235U antineutrino spectrum. We will report on the status and initial performance of the experiment.
Slides
12h35 Lunch break
14h00 Sterile Neutrinos and Interpretations 2 Chair: H. Minakata
17+3 SoLid: Search for Oscillations with a Lithium-6 Detector at the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor Nick Van Remortel Antwerp University
Abstract

SoLid: Search for Oscillations with a Lithium-6 Detector at the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor

Several anomalies in the neutrino sector are pointing towards the existence of a new (sterile) neutrino state with a mass around 1 eV. The SoLid experiment is located at the SCK•CEN BR2 research reactor in Belgium and will investigate this possibility. Using the large flux of anti-neutrino generated in the reactor, it will collect a high statistics sample of Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) events. These will be used to study the energy and distance dependence of the neutrino flux, which in turn will be used un-ambiguous support or reject the evidence of sterile neutrinos being the cause of these anomalies. The measurement is challenging as one has to operate a detector very close to the high radiation environment of a nuclear reactor and on the surface with little overburden to shield against cosmic rays. SoLid is employing a new technology combining PVT (cubes of 5x5x5 cm3) and 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillators (sheets ~250 μm thickness) to face these challenges. The highly segmented detector is read out by a network of wavelength shifting fibres and MPPCs, which allows for a precise localization of the IBD reaction products. Neutrons captured in the 6Li can be easily separated from electromagnetic particles (e+, γ), which are absorbed in the PVT, due to the different response of the respective scintillators. The 1.6-tons detector was installed towards the end of 2017 and is taking date since early 2018. We will describe the detector design, the experimental setup at BR2 and the detection principle. This will be followed by a first look at the data.
Slides
17+3 Updated MiniBooNE νμ → νe Oscillation on Results En-Chuan Huang Los Alamos
Abstract

Updated MiniBooNE νμ → νe Oscillation on Results

In this talk, I will present the MiniBooNE oscillation analysis with 12.84 × 1020 protons on target (POT) νe appearance data, doubled from the previous oscillation publication, and 11.27 × 1020 POT ν̄e appearance data. A significant combined excess is observed for the electron-like charged-current quasi-elastic events. The best fit for a simple two-neutrino oscillation model has a probability of 20.1%, compared with a probability of 5 × 10-7 for the null hypothesis. The excess observed by the MiniBooNE experiment is consistent with the excess reported by the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment, indicating strong evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model.
Slides
25+5 MicroBooNE and the Future SBN Program Roxanne Guenette Harvard
Abstract

MicroBooNE and the Future SBN Program

The Short-Baseline Neutrino (SBN) Program consists of a suite of three liquid argon neutrino detectors, designed to resolve the previous short-baseline anomalies observed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments, and to perform highly needed neutrino cross-section measurements on argon. In addition to reviewing the status of the full program, including the progress on the construction and installation of the near detector (SBND) and the far detector (ICARUS), this talk will focus on recent results from the first SBN detector, the MicroBooNE experiment, which has been recording and analyzing neutrino data since October 2015. The first physics results will be presented.
Slides
25+5 Sterile Neutrinos — the Global Picture Michele Maltoni Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC
Abstract

Sterile Neutrinos — the Global Picture

In this talk I will discuss the present phenomenological status of neutrino oscillation models including sterile neutrino states, with particular attention to the possibility of explaining in a comprehensive way the various anomalies observed in reactor and short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.
Slides
15h40 Coffee break
16h10 Sterile Neutrinos and Interpretations 3/Neutrinos and Cosmology Chair: A. Dighe
21+4 Other Experimental Approaches to the Sterile Neutrino and Possible Applications Jonathan Link Virginia Tech
Abstract

Other Experimental Approaches to the Sterile Neutrino and Possible Applications

Beyond the short-baseline program at Fermilab and the existing world-wide collection of ultra-short-baseline reactor experiments, there are other concepts for dedicated sterile neutrino searches. This talk will outline the proposals not covered in other talks. In addition it will discuss general considerations which apply to all experiments and highlight ways to optimize experiments in light of these considerations. Finally, potential applications arising from the technologies being developed for sterile neutrino searches will be reviewed.
Slides
25+5 Neutrino Properties from Cosmology Julien Lesgourgues RWTH Aachen
Abstract

Neutrino Properties from Cosmology

We will summarise current constraints from cosmological data on the neutrino relic density and masses, as well as other possible observable properties of the neutrino sector (leptonic asymmetry, light sterile neutrinos, etc.) We will also present forecasts of the sensitivity of future cosmological experiments to neutrino masses.
Slides
21+4 Leptogenesis and the Dirac Phase Marco Drewes Université catholique de Louvain
Abstract

Leptogenesis and the Dirac Phase

The mounting evidence for CP violation in the leptonic sector raises the question to which degree a measurement of the Dirac phase can reveal information on leptogenesis as a possible origin of the baryonic matter in the universe. While the Dirac phase is irrelevant for the simplest "vanilla leptogenesis" scenario, it can play an important role in scenarios where flavour effects are important. We report recent progress in the theoretical treatment of such scenarios. We focus on low scale seesaw models in which the heavy neutrinos that drive leptogenesis can be searched for experimentally, and a combination of data from high energy experiments with searches for neutrinoless double beta decay and long baseline neutrino experiments can be used to test leptogenesis.
Slides
17h30 End of the Day
Saturday, 9th June 2018
09h00 Supernova Neutrinos/Neutrinos and Gravitational Waves 1 Chair: B. Kayser
21+4 Neutrino-driven Explosions in 3D Supernova Simulations Hans-Thomas Janka Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik
Abstract

Neutrino-driven Explosions in 3D Supernova Simulations

First three-dimensional, first-principle simulations of core-collapse supernovae have become possible in the recent past. They demonstrate the basic viability of the neutrino-driven mechanism for powering the explosions of the majority of supernova progenitors. However, important questions still remain to be settled. These include basic technical aspects such as the influence of the numerical resolution or the method of the neutrino-transport treatment, as well as important physics aspects such as the initial stellar conditions and still missing physics, for example effects of muon formation and neutrino oscillations. The talk will review the current status of 3D supernova modeling and of our understanding of neutrino-driven explosions. It will also provide an outlook on current progress for answering the open questions mentioned.
Slides
21+4 Supernova Neutrinos: Challenges and Opportunities Basudeb Dasgupta Tata Institute
Abstract

Supernova Neutrinos: Challenges and Opportunities

Neutrinos are crucial ingredients for supernova explosions, and come to us bearing important particle physics and astrophysics information. Current and upcoming neutrino detectors are poised to detect these neutrinos, either as a diffuse background or, with luck, as a Galactic signal. I will review recent developments in supernova neutrino physics, including our rapidly evolving understanding of collective neutrino oscillations.
Slides
21+4 LIGO-Virgo's Discovery of a Binary Neutron Star Merger from a Multi-messenger Perspective Imre Bartos University of Florida
Abstract

LIGO-Virgo's Discovery of a Binary Neutron Star Merger from a Multi-messenger Perspective

The recent discoveries of gravitational waves by LIGO and Virgo unveiled numerous opportunities in astrophysics, as well as in the study of the cosmos and the laws of physics. In particular, the observation of a binary neutron star merger and the ensuing multi-messenger follow-up campaign already yielded a range of expected and unexpected findings, giving us a taste of what is yet to come. I will introduce the recent discovery neutron star merger GW170817 and what we learned from them, in particular from the perspective of what we learned from multi-messenger data. I will discuss the high-energy neutrino follow-up effort by ANTARES, IceCube, and the Pierre Auger Observatory, what we learned from these searches, and what we can expect for the near future when the rate of gravitational-wave discoveries is set to rapidly increase.
Slides
10h15 Coffee break
10h45 Neutrinos and Gravitational Waves 2/Connections to Dark Matter Chair: Y. Suzuki
30+5 The Role of Neutrinos in the Multi-Messenger Picture of Binary Neutron Star Mergers Brian Metzger Columbia University
Abstract

The Role of Neutrinos in the Multi-Messenger Picture of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

On August 17 the LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave observatories detected the first binary neutron star merger event (GW170817), a discovery followed by the most ambitious electromagnetic (EM) follow-up campaign ever conducted. Within 2 seconds of the merger, a weak burst of gamma-rays was discovered by the Fermi and INTEGRAL satellites. Within 11 hours, a bright but rapidly-fading thermal optical counterpart was discovered in the galaxy NGC 4993 at a distance of only 130 Million light years. The properties of the optical transient match remarkably well predictions for "kilonova" emission powered by the radioactive decay of heavy nuclei synthesized in the expanding merger ejecta by rapid neutron capture nucleosynthesis (r-process). The rapid spectral evolution of the kilonova emission to near-infrared wavelengths demonstrates that a portion of the ejecta contains heavy lanthanide nuclei. I will describe efforts to create a unified scenario for the range of EM counterparts from GW170817 and their implications for the astrophysical origin of the r-process and the properties of neutron stars. I will focus on the crucial role played by neutrinos in shaping the signals from this event, particularly the color of the kilonova emission. I will also address prospects for detecting ultra-high energy neutrinos from future mergers, particularly in cases where the merger remnant survives as a long-lived magnetized neutron star before collapsing into a black hole.
Slides
21+4 keV Neutrinos and Dark Matter Kevork Abazajian UC Irvine
Abstract

keV Neutrinos and Dark Matter

I will give an overview of the status of keV sterile neutrinos as dark matter, including the production mechanisms in the early universe and detectability today. I will give the status of indirect searches, including the candidate X-ray line at 3.55 keV and prospects for future searches. I will also discuss laboratory detection methods, including searches in beta decay and K-capture nuclei.
Slides
21+4 Synergies between future Neutrino and Dark Matter Detectors Rafael Lang Purdue University
Abstract

Synergies between future Neutrino and Dark Matter Detectors

Neutrino detectors are viable experiments to search for some proposed dark matter models and signals. Conversely, as direct dark matter detectors extend their reach, they become sensitive to a series of neutrino signals, such as solar pp and boron-8 neutrinos, supernova neutrinos. Even a competitive search for neutrinoless double-beta decay may be possible with future dark matter detectors. I will emphasize the complementarity of these approaches while sketching possible synergies, thus presenting some of the opportunities that lie at the interface between neutrino and dark matter experiments.
Slides
12h10 Lunch break
13h45 Closing Session Chair: Ch. Weinheimer
35+5 Neutrino 2018: Messages from a Theorist Francesco Vissani LNGS / GSSI

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35+5 Experimental Outlook Takaaki Kajita ICRR, Tokyo University

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15 Closing Guido Drexlin Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Slides
15 Report from INC Stephen Parke Fermilab Slides
15h35 End of the Day